HOW WE HELP

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Learn to play an instrument

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Every music session is different at No Strings Attached (Scotland) because every person is different.

We provide opportunities to learn a woodwind instrument free of charge in one to one sessions with a qualified music teacher, as part of a larger group or – if you would like - to participate in a public performance.

I used to go to the doctor every few weeks, but thanks to No Strings Attached (Scotland) I can manage my asthma and only need to go for six monthly reviews.

Jack

16

I understand Asthma better now and know what to ask the doctor when I go to see them.

Sophie

12

I used to be off school a lot with asthma and missed a lot of work but now I feel like I can control my asthma and rarely miss a day.

Alexis

13

I can now play with my friends more, before I used to get puffed out all the time and had to sit things out.

Mohammed

12

Self-Management

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Asthma can be a stressful condition to manage, and stress can even cause asthma attacks.

It can affect people in different ways – some people suffer from asthma symptoms constantly, some only get symptoms every few weeks, while others have their asthma so well controlled that they hardly experience any symptoms at all.

Our asthma nurse, helps our young people to better manage their condition through a better understanding of asthma and its treatments, working alongside existing client medical support, both with our young people and their parents/carers.

Our asthma nurse, along with your GP or Health Practice, can also help to develop a self-management plan to work out how well you are and what to do if your asthma gets worse or better.

To learn more about a self-management plan
please visit Asthma UK or call Asthma UK on 0300 222 5800.

Parents

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Learning that your child has asthma can knock the wind out of parents. We support the whole family emotionally and practically to deal with the stress and worry that living with asthma can cause.

Our informal peer support group provides an opportunity to meet other parents to simply talk, share advice and relax while watching your child enjoy themselves. Too many people suffer asthma alone, we help break that isolation.

My daughter has benefitted a lot. She learned to play a music instrument which she never thought she would able to do, and I have notice an improvement in her breathing.

June

40

Asthma Glossary for Parents

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ACTION PLAN

This is the personal plan you set up with your child’s doctor that indicates when your child should take different types of medicine or what to do in an emergency. It’s sometimes called an Asthma Management Plan.

ALLERGEN

Something that can cause your child to cough or wheeze or have an asthma flare-up.  Common allergens include dust mites, cockroach droppings, dander from pets, and pollen from trees, grass and weeds.

ALLERGY

When your child’s body is sensitive to certain things, they have an allergy to them.  Having an allergy to something can cause sneezing, itchy eyes, a stuffy nose, coughing, wheezing and a hard time breathing. If your child has allergies, it doesn’t mean they have asthma. It just means that their allergies can make their asthma worse.

ANTI-INFLAMMATORY MEDICINE

A medicine that reduces or prevents inflammation, or swelling, in the lungs to help your child breathe better. Anti-inflammatory medicine also causes the lining of the lungs to produce less mucus.  Anti-inflammatory medicines that are swallowed, like in a pill or syrup, are taken when your child has serious symptoms and they need fast relief.  But anti-inflammatory medicines that are breathed in through an inhaler are used to prevent asthma symptoms and to keep inflammation in the lungs under control.

ASTHMA

A condition that makes your child’s lungs sensitive and can make it hard for them to breathe.  The inflammation causes wheezing, shortness of breath, chest tightness, and coughing. Your child’s asthma can be controlled by taking the right medicine, and by avoiding their asthma triggers.

ASTHMA TRIGGER

Anything that can cause asthma, an asthma flare-up, or make your child’s asthma symptoms worse. These symptoms can include a cough, wheeze, chest tightness, or shortness of breath. Common asthma triggers are a cold or flu, cold air, exercise, dust, pet dander, pollen, smoke, chalkdust, and air pollution. Sometimes things that don’t seem like asthma triggers can act like them, such as getting scared, and even laughing or crying really hard.

BRONCHI

The bronchi are the tubes in your lungs that air passes through when you breathe.  Bronchi are another name for airways.

BRONCHOCONSTRICTION

Bronchoconstriction is when the muscles in your child’s lungs squeeze together and make it hard for them to breathe. Bronchoconstriction causes your child to feel tightness in their chest, to have shortness of breath, and to hear a wheezing sound when they breathe.

BRONCHODILATOR

A medicine that opens up the airways in the lungs. There are two types of bronchodilators. The first type is a short-acting one  (such as albuterol) that quickly opens up the airways in the lungs when they become tight due to asthma. This type of bronchodilator should always be with your child in case they need quick relief.  The second type of bronchodilator is long-acting and is taken it daily to prevent asthma symptoms.

ANTI-INFLAMMATORY MEDICINE

Anti-inflammatory medicine is taken to help prevent the swelling and mucus that builds up in your child’s lungs. Corticosteroid medicines are the most common types of anti-inflammatory medicine and are very similar to the natural steroids that the body produces to control inflammation. Corticosteroids are different from the harmful steroids that athletes and body builders take. Corticosteroid medicine that is swallowed (usually as pills or liquid) is for serious symptoms, but corticosteroid medicine that is breathed in is used to prevent symptoms.

DRY POWDER INHALER (DPI)

A type of inhaler used to get medicine into your child’s lungs.  This medicine device delivers a specific amount of medicine into the lungs which comes out in a dry, powder form.

INFLAMMATION

Inflammation is the swelling that’s always in your child’s lungs when they have asthma. Inflammation can build up and even block the airways, making it difficult for your child to breathe. Inflammation usually gets worse when your child comes into contact with their asthma triggers. Anti-inflammatory medicine helps reduce the inflammation that is always in your child’s lungs and prevents inflammation from building up in the first place.

INHALER

This is a device that is used to get medicine into the lungs.  Inhalers can be used to take either long-term control medicine or quick-relief medicine. An inhaler is sometimes called a Puffer, Pump, MDI or DPI.

LONG-TERM CONTROL MEDICINE

Medicine that your child takes every day to help manage their asthma and prevent asthma symptoms.  One type of long-term control medicine is an inhaled anti-inflammatory. Long-term control medicine is sometimes called Controller medicine or Preventer medicine.

METERED DOSE INHALER (MDI)

A type of inhaler used to get medicine into your child’s lungs.  An MDI is a small spray canister that is used to take medicine that is inhaled through the mouth.  An MDI is sometimes called an Inhaler or Puffer.

MUCUS

A thick, sticky substance made to protect and moisten parts of the body, including the lungs and nose.  Having some mucus is good because it can help trap asthma triggers, but if too much mucus builds up, it can make it very hard to breathe.

NEBULIZER MACHINE

A machine that turns medicine into a mist or spray so that your child can breathe it into their lungs. Usually a face mask or mouthpiece is used with a nebulizer machine to make sure the medicine gets into the lungs.

PEAK FLOW METER
(ALSO CALLED A PEAK FLOW MONITOR)

A peak flow meter lets your child know how open their airways are.  It is a device used to measure how much air your child can breathe out of their lungs, just like a thermometer measures their fever.  Peak flow meters help you monitor your child’s asthma so you can stay on top of any changes in their breathing.  There are three zones on the peak flow meter: a green zone which tells you that your child’s breathing is at its best; a yellow zone that means your child needs to take quick relief medicine; and a red zone that says your child needs to take emergency medicine and to tell you or a doctor right away.

PERSONAL BEST NUMBER

This is the highest number your child can get on a peak flow meter when their breathing is at its best.  It is the number your child aims for when they take their daily peak flow reading.

PUFFER

Another name for an inhaler, or pump, that is used to take asthma medicine.

QUICK-RELIEF MEDICINE

Quick-relief medicines  (such as albuterol) work by opening the airways quickly when your child feels asthma symptoms such as coughing, chest tightness, wheezing, or shortness of breath.  These medicines are also called short-term medicines, rescue medicines, reliever medicines, or bronchodilators.  If these medicines do not give your child fast relief, your child needs to tell you or their doctor right away.

SIDE EFFECTS

This is a name for any problems that can be caused by taking medicine, like getting a headache or stomachache. Tell your child’s doctor about any side effects they may feel from their medication.

SPACER CHAMBER

A spacer is a device that can be attached to the end of a metered dose inhaler to help get medicine into the lungs. It helps to make sure that the medicine is getting into the lungs. The Spacer Chamber has a place for a mouthpiece or mask on one end, and a place for an inhaler on the other end. There are two kinds of Spacer chambers that can attach to an inhaler: a Tube spacer, which looks like a plastic tube, and a Bag spacer, which looks like a plastic bag.

Asthma Glossary for Kids

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ACTION PLAN

This is the personal plan you set up with your doctor that tells you when you should take different types of medicine or what to do in an emergency.

ALLERGEN

Something that can cause you to cough or wheeze or have an asthma flare-up.

ALLERGY

When your body is sensitive to certain things, you have an allergy to them.

ANTI-INFLAMMATORY MEDICINE

- A medicine that reduces or prevents inflammation in the lungs to help you breathe better.

ASTHMA

A disease that makes your lungs sensitive and can make it hard to breathe.

ASTHMA TRIGGER

- Anything that can cause asthma, an asthma flare up, or make your asthma symptoms worse.

BRONCHI

Your bronchi are the tubes in your lungs that air passes through when you breathe.

BRONCHOCONSTRICTION

Bronchoconstriction is when the muscles in your lungs squeeze together and make it hard for you to breathe.

BRONCHODILATOR

 A medicine that opens up the airways in the lungs.

ANTI-INFLAMMATORY MEDICINE

Anti-inflammatory medicine is taken to help prevent the swelling and mucus that builds up in your lungs.

DRY POWDER INHALER (DPI)

This medicine device delivers a specific amount of medicine into the lungs. It comes out in a dry, powder form.

INFLAMMATION

Inflammation is the swelling that's always in your lungs when you have asthma.

INHALER

This is a device that is used to get medicine into the lungs.

LONG-TERM CONTROL MEDICINE

Medicine that you take every day to help manage your asthma and prevent asthma symptoms.

METERED DOSE INHALER (MDI)

A type of inhaler used to get medicine into your lungs. An MDI is a small spray canister that is used to take medicine that you inhale through your mouth.

MUCUS

A thick, sticky substance that protects and moisten parts of the body, including the lungs and nose.

NEBULIZER MACHINE

A machine that turns medicine into a mist or spray so that you can breathe it into your lungs.

PEAK FLOW METER
(ALSO CALLED A PEAK FLOW MONITOR)

A device used to measure how much air you can breathe out of your lungs, just like a thermometer measures your temperature.

PERSONAL BEST NUMBER

This is the highest number you can get on a peak flow meter when your breathing is at its best.

PUFFER

Another name for an inhaler, or pump, that you use to take asthma medicine.

QUICK-RELIEF MEDICINE

Quick-relief medicines (such as albuterol) work by opening the airways quickly when you feel asthma symptoms such as coughing, chest tightness, wheezing, or shortness of breath.

SIDE EFFECTS

This is a name for any problems that can be caused by taking your medicine, like getting a headache or stomachache.

SPACER CHAMBER

A spacer is a device that can be attached to the end of your metered dose inhaler to help get medicine into your lungs.

Professionals

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We are keen to promote links with health professionals and are always happy to discuss potential referrals and discuss how we can potentially help the individual. Should you be interested in collaboration please contact us.

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Schools

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For children and young people with asthma, school represents a very important setting for managing asthma which can either be supportive or pose barriers to successful asthma control.

Asthma symptoms that do not warrant urgent medical attention or absence from school can still prevent full participation in the classroom through an inability to get a good night’s sleep, to concentrate during class, or to participate in vigorous play or activities.

We can help to ensure communication and collaboration among teachers, families, and health professionals, including what to do when an attack occurs.

If you think we could benefit you or a family member, a parental guardian please contact Fiona:

EVENTS

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Keep up to date with our forthcoming events.

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